The Sonic Society

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Acting Tips: Worst Things in Audition

Richard Edmonson, director of the Summer Stock play "To Kill a Mockingbird" holds auditions for his production May 26 in the COAS.  Auditions will continue June 6.

Richard Edmonson, director of the Summer Stock play “To Kill a Mockingbird” holds auditions for his production May 26 in the COAS. Auditions will continue June 6.

As we gear up for another great session of recordings here at EVP we look into some of the ideas that make and break good acting auditions.

According to this Green Shirt Studio articlethe worst thing you can do is not let your own light shine in the audition. Check out the thoughts from the author and give us yours! What’s the dos and don’ts of auditioning in the audio world? Is it very different from the stage?


About The Author

Born to Teachers and Amateur Audio Enthusiasts in the small rural community of Belwood, Jack's first love was stories- writing, reading, telling, and singing. He developed his acting skills through High School, University, and through film and community theatre. Jack writes the lion's share of Electric Vicuna's Audio Drama scripts and has his own writing site at www.jackjward.com He's thrilled to co-host the Sonic Society with his wonderful, talented, friend David Ault!

Comments

2 Responses to “Acting Tips: Worst Things in Audition”

  1. I really like the advice to make sure that you are letting your light shine through. You want to be sure that you are doing what you can to let your personality be known. Do you have any other tips about acting? I’m trying to learn how to act, but I don’t know the first thing about how to do it.

  2. Jack says:

    Thanks so much for your thoughts Johnny. Audio acting is the most intimate of any medium. Unless you’re going for some kind of cartoonish character, you can’t really act like you’re acting on a stage with grand gestures and exaggerated voicings. You have to first figure out what kind of tone the audio drama is taking. Is it more of a stage play style and therefore giving at least a little distance between the audience and the actor? Or is it very intimate and in the heads of us all as we listen? Your mike positioning for your recording will make a huge difference as to how you sound to everyone.
    The key of course is to not act. Live the part. Don’t sound like you’re reading. And when all else fails, listen to Tanja Milojevic from Lightning Bolt Theatre and some of our productions. She’s pixie dust scattered on a microphone! 🙂

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